Korn Ferry appoints Alina Polonskaia as diversity and inclusion leader

16 November 2018 Consulting.ca

LA-based human capital consultancy Korn Ferry has brought in Alina Polonskaia as its Global Leader of Diversity and Inclusion Solutions. Formerly Mercer’s global leader of Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) Executive Peer Networks, Polonskaia has deep expertise in the areas of organizational transformation and diversity initiatives. She will be based in Korn Ferry’s Toronto office.

In her new role at Korn Ferry, Alina Polonskaia will help clients align their strategy and talent to drive better performance. She will also be responsible for designing structures, practices, roles, and responsibilities that facilitate structural and behavioural inclusion.

Numerous studies have correlated diversity with improved financial performance: a 2018 McKinsey study, for example, found that firms in the top quartile for executive team gender diversity were 21% more likely to experience above-average profitability; those in the top quartile for ethnic/cultural diversity had a 35% likelihood of outperformance. As such, firms are designing inclusion policies and implementing diversity strategies – either in-house or with the professional support of consultancies like Korn Ferry.

Before joining Korn Ferry, Polonskaia led HR consultancy Mercer’s Diversity and Inclusion peer networks of cross-industry diversity leaders, which included numerous companies from the Global Fortune 1000 and FTSE 100. Before that, she was a Principal at the firm for two years, supporting clients in the areas of organizational design/effectiveness/change, as well as D&I.Alina Polonskaia - Diversity and Inclusion Leader at Korn Ferry

Prior to her time with Mercer, Polonskaia was a Principal at management consultancy Oliver Wyman, which is a Marsh & McLennan company alongside Mercer. While there, she likewise focused on solving organizational challenges. Some of her notable projects included helping a large pharma company manage a large-scale organizational transformation, and helping redesign a global retail organization. Polonskaia served as a Senior Associate at the firm before being promoted to Principal.

Polonskaia started her consulting career as a Senior Consultant at IBM Global Business Services, where she tackled client challenges in the areas of change management and training & education.

“I am very excited about the impact Alina will have for our firm in the D&I space,” said Mark Arian, CEO, Advisory, Korn Ferry. “We are committed to helping clients have a positive impact on their workforce with newer and better approaches to diversity and inclusion. The addition of Alina will only help accelerate our efforts in this space."

Polonskaia holds an MBA from the Richard Ivey School of Business at the University of Western Ontario, as well as a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Irkutsk State University in Siberia, Russia.

Within Canada, Korn Ferry has offices in Toronto, Ottawa, and Calgary. The LA-based firm has over 100 offices worldwide, and is a partner to 98% of Fortune 100 firms.

In other Korn Ferry news, the company recently launched two new talent acquisition products – which leverage predictive analytics and deep data sets to determine the best candidate for a given role.

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Engineering consultancy Arup appoints Craig Forrest as Canada leader

17 April 2019 Consulting.ca

Global design and engineering consultancy Arup has named Craig Forrest as the leader of its Canadian operations.

Founded in London in 1946, Arup is one of the world’s largest engineering consultancies, with 16,000 global employees, including 1,700 in the Americas. Over the course of seven decades, the built environment specialist has worked on projects in more than 160 countries.

Arup opened its first Canadian office in 1999, and today has more than 320 employees in locations in Toronto and Montreal. The firm’s Canadian offices have seen strong organic growth in recent years, with Arup further projecting approximately 20% growth for 2019. The firm has completed many notable projects in Canada, including the structural, mechanical, and electrical engineering work on the Michael Lee-Chin Crystal at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Engineering consultancy Arup appoints Craig Forrest as Canada leader

The consultancy has now appointed company veteran Craig Forrest as its Canada Group leader effective April 1. Forrest, who has been with Arup for 12 years, was most recently the global leader of its business and investor advisory practice, which is based out of London.  Forrest brings more than 24 years of experience in infrastructure advisory, tackling projects across energy, aviation, water, transport, and cities to his new role as the head of Arup in Canada. He will be based out of the Toronto office.

Forrest takes over from Andrew McAlpine, who will remain at Arup as a principal.

"We are excited to welcome Craig to the Toronto office as we continue to grow our business and investor advisory work throughout Canada," Andy Howard, chair of Arup Americas, said. "Craig's track record of providing owners, operators, and investors with strategic market and financial advice combined with his deep technical knowledge positions him well to champion Arup's growing influence in Canada."

Forrest joined Arup in 2007 as the commercial director of its infrastructure practice in Europe. Before that, he was a general manager at Rolls Royce Power Ventures, where he oversaw the development, construction, project financing, and operation of investments across the EMEA region. Forrest started his engineering consulting career at Mott MacDonald

"I am honored to be joining the Canadian team at this exciting moment as the region is poised to achieve significant growth," Forrest said. "The Canadian market is experiencing robust levels of public and private sector investment, and I am confident Arup will continue to deliver a broadening spectrum of highly valued services to our clients to help them conceive, plan and deliver important projects of all types."

Related: Arup launches VR tool to design child-friendly cities